Sun

29

Dec

2013

Health - Corruption - India

The Economic Times (India):  A collection of articles about Corruption

 

http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/keyword/corruption

 

 

Volume 29, Issue 1, March 2001, Pages 66–79

Abstract

This study introduces a new perspective on the role of corruption in economic growth and provides quantitative estimates of the impact of corruption on the growth and importance of the transmission channels. In our ordinary least squares estimations, we find that a 1% increase in the corruption level reduces the growth rate by about 0.72% or, expressed differently, a one-unit increase in the corruption index reduces the growth rate by 0.545 percentage points. The most important channel through which corruption affects economic growth is political instability, which accounts for about 53% of the total effect. We also find that corruption reduces the level of human capital and the share of private investment. J. Comp. Econ., March 2001 29(1), pp. 66–79. School of Business, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

 

Journal of Economic Literature Classification Numbers: O40, O50.

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Tue

12

Mar

2013

A Holy Horse. India

AP/dpa

 

A holy horse is showered in bright orange turmeric powder as an offering to the shepherd god Khandoba in India's Pune district. The celebration, called Somavati Amavasya, is a day of special significance to Hindus when the new moon falls on a Monday.

 

 

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Tue

05

Jun

2012

America's Rank Hypocrisy

From Reader Supported News

By Noam Chomsky, AlterNet

05 June 12

 

In his penetrating study "Ideal Illusions: How the U.S. Government Co-Opted Human Rights," international affairs scholar James Peck observes, "In the history of human rights, the worst atrocities are always committed by somebody else, never us" - whoever "us" is.

 

Almost any moment in history yields innumerable illustrations. Let's keep to the past few weeks.

 


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Mon

07

May

2012

India's Loss of Languages

India's tribal people fast becoming lost for words

 

INDIA LOSING LANGUAGES FASTER THAN ANYWHERE ELSE ON EARTH


Of the 7000 languages now spoken across the world, only about 600 are expected to survive until the end of the century. Totopara in India is fighting to keep it's language alive.

 

Read more:

India's tribal people fast becoming lost for words

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Wed

04

Apr

2012

India's polio gains nurture hopes for further development

The victory over polio in India is a result of the work of the United Nations, the Global Polio Eradication initiative, the Indian government and the Indian people, write Ted Turner, founder of the United Nations Foundation, and N.R. Narayana Murthy, one of its board members. The success shows that countries can simultaneously accomplish economic and sustainable development, which India also is pursuing through two UN programs, Every Woman Every Child and the Sustainable Energy for All Initiative. For more, see The Times of India.  India celebrated an historic milestone earlier this montha (4/2

1 Comments

Sun

11

Mar

2012

A festival in India - Holi

 

Holi is one of the oldest festivals of India. There are many interesting stories associated with the festival's origin as one moves across the different states from North to South and East to West. Paintings and scriptures depict the roots of the festival. Mythology plays a very important part in narrating the festival of Holi. The most popular stories of Holi origin relates to 'Holika Dahan' and Legend of Radha-Krishan.

 


 

The legend of Radha and Krishna is closely linked with this tradition of colors on Holi. Young Krishna, who had a dark complexion was jealous of his beloved Radha's extremely fair skin. In a mischievous mood, he applied color on Radha's face. Following this ancient legend, lovers till date long to color their beloved as an expression of love. 

 

 

 

Thanks to Raji/Rose a great chat group person from India we have this description and these pictures of an important holiday.

 

Holi is one of the major festivals of India and is the most vibrant of all. The joys of Holi knows no bound. The festival is celebrated across the four corners of India or rather across the globe. The festival is filled with so much fun and frolic that the very mention of the word 'Holi' draws smile and enthusiasm amongst the people. Holi also celebrates the arrival of Spring, a season of joy and hope. 

Integrally entwined with Holi, is the tradition of 'Holika Dahan', which is actually lighting of bonfires. The ritual is symbolic of victory of good over evil and has its root in the legend of demon king Hiranyakashyap who wished to end his blessed son, Prahlad's life with the help of his sister, Holika who burnt in the fir and no harm occurred to Prahlad. Since then the day is celebrated in victory of good over bad. 

 

 

 

Holi is famous as Basant Utsav in rural India. It is one of the major festivals in India and is celebrated with extreme enthusiasm and joy. Gulal, abeer and pichkaris are synonymous with the festival. Elaborate plans are made to color the loved ones. Everybody wants to be the first one to color the other. In the ensuing battle of colors, everybody is drowned not just in colors of gulal but also in love and mirth. People love to drench others and themselves in colored water. Gujiyas and other sweets are offered to everyone who comes across to color.


Temples are beautifully decorated at the time of Holi. Idol of Radha is placed on swings and devotees turn the swings singing devotional Holi songs. Now-a-days small plays are organized reflecting the spirit of the festival.

 

What is remarkably same across the country is the spirit of Holi. Fun, frolic, boisterousness to the extent of buffoonery marks this festival of colors. What more can be expected- when the people get a social sanction to get intoxicated on the bhang, open not just their hearts' out but also their lungs. And viola, nobody is expected to take offense too, as the norm of the day is, 'Bura na mano Holi hai' .

 


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Wed

08

Sep

2010

What Is the NDM-1 Superbug? Drug-Resistant Health Threat Explained

Katie Drummond

Contributor

AOL News Surge Desk

(Aug. 11) -- A new, drug-resistant superbug has spread from India to the U.K., and health experts are warning that it could become a worldwide health hazard.

 

An enzyme called New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase, or NDM-1, is the culprit in question. NDM-1 is found inside bacteria, like E. coli, and makes them extremely virulent and resistant to most antibiotics.

 

But how is the bacteria transmitted, and are Americans at risk? Surge Desk checks it out.

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Wed

08

Sep

2010

"Superbug" Gene Hits Japan

The Huffington Post 9/7/10

TOKYO — Japan has confirmed the nation's first case of a new gene in bacteria that allows the microorganisms to become drug-resistant superbugs, detected in a man who had medical treatment in India, a Health Ministry official said Tuesday.

The gene, known as NDM-1, was found in a Japanese man in his 50s, Kensuke Nakajima said.

Researchers say the gene – which appears to be circulating widely in India – alters bacteria, making them resistant to nearly all known antibiotics.

Drug-resistant bacteria are not new. Many bacteria are resistant to the world's first antibiotic, penicillin, as well as successive generations of drugs. Excessive use and improper use of antibiotics have exacerbated the problem and led to the emergence of superbugs.

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Thu

02

Sep

2010

India widens security crackdown to Google, Skype

THURSDAY Sep 02, 2010 08:12 ET India widens security crackdown to Google,Skype By ERIKA KINETZ, Associated Press AP

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