Tue

25

Mar

2014

Plurals

From St. John Karp Blog 

 

The Problem with Plurals

or: Quis Castigabit Ipsos Castigatores?

January 5, 2012 

 

If you’re like most of us, you’ve said something perfectly normal only to have some creep pounce on your grammar. “Actually, it’s ‘I can’t get any satisfaction.’ I think you’ll find it’s ‘The lovers, the dreamers and I.’”1 If you’re an incorrigible bastard like me, you’ve occasionally been that creep (although, I maintain, in the politest possible way). But what happens when even the pedants are wrong? Because even the snarkiest censors will occasionally be wrong themselves, especially when it comes to that glorious goldmine of the English language: plural nouns. Everyone — and I mean everyone — screws these up from time to time. But the problem isn’t with the English language itself. The problem lies squarely with foreign loan words and the people who insist on using them correctly. 

 

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Wed

20

Jun

2012

More Paraprosdokians

From Trust - Alternet News

 

"In one case described in the report, Eliezer "Boy" Billanes, a community leader in the Philippines who campaigned against a new copper and gold mining project, was shot dead by two unidentified men riding a motorcycle whilst buying a newspaper."

 

Wow - sure a hard way to buy a newspaper (and they shouldn't read whilst driving!!!).

2 Comments

Thu

14

Jun

2012

Paraprosdokian Headlines

A.Word.A.Day with Anu Garg


There's a well-known (and possibly made-up) newspaper headline:

 
Teacher Strikes Idle Kids

 

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Tue

12

Jun

2012

Inappropriate Grammar Rules

From delanceyplace.com 4/26/12

Excerpt from 

You Are What You Speak: Grammar Grouches, Language Laws, and the Politics of Identity

by Robert Lane Greene by Delacorte Press

In today's encore excerpt - certain grammatical "rules" that are widely viewed as correct come from the invalid application of grammatical rules from Classical Latin and Greek to the English language by British authors writing hundreds of years ago. Two such "rules"-which have been beautifully and routinely violated by writers from Shakespeare to Hemingway-are the prohibitions against split infinitives and ending a sentence with a preposition:
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